September album reviews

The National – Sleep Well Beast

‘Nobody Else Will Be There’, ‘Day I Die’, ‘Born to Beg’, ‘I’ll Still Destroy You’. These are all titles from the National’s latest, Sleep Well Beast. They really are the emos of indie, but they manage repeatedly to find sincere musical splendour in all that’s so terrible. High Violet and Trouble Will Find Me made the National an arena band, a festival headliner – they’ve become one of this decade’s most formidable acts. And yet, seven years on from High Violet, their tracks reflect the spirit of their works spanning back almost 20 years. Sleep Well Beast presents everything already loved about the National, with many gentle, pensive moments (‘Born to Beg’, ‘Carin At The Liquor Store’) facing up against the kind of “mainstream” National (‘The System Only Dreams In Total Darkness’) and aggressively huge tracks that demand attention (‘Turtleneck’). Its title track ends the album as one of its more intriguing inclusions – a warping addition with just-woke-up vocals and discordant guitar solos. Like much of Sleep Well Beast, it’s gloom-filled, yet lets shards of hope through. It’s confusing, but it’s beautiful.

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Foo Fighters – Concrete and Gold

Foo Fighters release albums like clockwork, having not let three years pass between any of their nine records. For a long time I’ve been strung along by Dave’s rock formula. Yes it’s predictable, but who cares – it’s bloody fun. There’s no denying there’s been some duds along the way, but there’s also no denying the anthems that have shone through, along with unrivalled videos and stage antics. A Foo Fighters live set is looong, because they have a lot to get through. Now they’re extending all that with Concrete and Gold. Album nine combines classic Fooies with the visceral grunt Wasting Light and Sonic Highways only hinted at. It’s exciting, a little unpredictable and blatantly heavy in its most exciting moments. Compared with previous efforts, Concrete and Gold has collectively more screaming, less lyrics and about the same guitar work. Opener ‘T-Shirt’ pulls the old-but-clever trick of “start really quiet and make them turn their speakers riiight up” before booming into a gone-too-soon, Queen-esque rock pomp. It kicks the adrenaline into gear and leads into ‘Run’, an altogether less interesting song, but screamed triumphantly none-the-less. Concrete and Gold continues with all sorts of throwback, greatly 70s sounding rock and roll. ‘Arrows’ is the big chorus track, as is pub rock chanter ‘The Sky Is A Neighborhood’, while ‘La Dee Da’ introduces psychedelic fuzz to the mix. Looking at the new additions to their collection, it’s easy for them to choose the crowd pleasers rather than the curveballs, but wouldn’t it be nice if they didn’t?

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Emily Haines & The Soft Skeleton – Choir of the Mind

I love Metric and had no idea Emily Haines had released a solo album before. Said solo debut is now 11 years old and Metric have had plenty of successes between then and now. Dressing her name up as Emily Haines & The Soft Skeleton, Choir of the Mind is not what you’d expect if, like me, you’d only heard the Canadian voice via Metric. If you expect the anthemic pop rock of Fantasies or Synthetica, you’re not gonna find it here. But if you’re keen to hear Haines’ calm side, her introspection, and something soulful and comforting, this solo outing is for you. There’s a dream state that floats through this record, held my Haines’ soothing voice and minimalist accompaniment. Piano, self-harmonies and vocal effects complement the voice, but there are occasional moments (like ‘Strangle All Romance’) where isolated vocals are all there is – a fine example of this pop vocalist’s versatility, given she’s more often heard layered over synths and guitars. ‘Nihilist Abyss’ is a standout track, with a distinctly eerie feeling and vocal trail-offs. It’s nice spooky punctuation on an otherwise wistful outing.

LCD Soundsystem – American Dream

Another one bites the dust, only to come back a few years later for a massive festival circuit and new album. Unless you’re particularly old or seriously despise one another, a band breakup these days actually just means a hiatus. Whether a comeback is actually worth doing is another matter. For LCD Soundsystem, coming back was absolutely the right thing to do. With only three albums to their name before this, the band was too young, had far too many huge tunes and maintained too killer a live reputation to call it quits. A reunion only took five years, but American Dream has taken seven. And it was well and truly worth the wait. The songs here are long (really long) and rekindle the band’s build and release methodology – layering infectious hooks slowly into dance pop tunes that get stuck in your head for days. There’s familiarity in various forms, too. ‘oh baby’ and ‘american dream’ sound like they’re from a classic 80s teen-film soundtrack and feel like they’ve always been a part of your musical life, while ‘other voices’ lends the spoken word character of ‘Pow Pow’ (from This Is Happening), punctuated by a chorus of voices chanting its title. The six minute ‘tonite’ proves the most driving, most addictive, and most dance worthy on American Dream, and takes out top track. This album is so distinctly LCD, its songs could have come from any time in the past two decades. Yet each song brings its own strengths to a catalogue already bulging with treasure, failing to disappoint from start to finish.

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The Killers – Wonderful Wonderful

The feature presentation is right up front on The Killers’ latest outing – ‘Wonderful Wonderful’ is a damn cool opener, blending oldschool U2 verses, desert psychedelia, and a rousing chorus for big effect. It’s a statement piece – The Killers announcing a mighty return to form. It leads into some of the most exciting Killers material since their inception, with bombastic track ‘The Man’ getting celebrations started before expansive ‘Rut’ presents the album’s second epic so close to its opener. The remainder of the album’s first half is large; ‘Life to Come’ delivering some more obvious U2-throwback with its wailing chorus, ‘Tyson vs Douglas’ providing the sick 80s guitar solos and ‘Run For Cover’ surpassing all other tracks on Wonderful Wonderful with its quick fire lyrics and addictive hook. Then, oddly, it all goes a bit soft. The back end of Wonderful Wonderful is full of glossy ballads and loses the edge that previously cut through the cheesiness. The division of tracks is obvious, and while I don’t have much against the latter tracks individually (‘Out Of My Mind’ is synth pop solid), all bunched together they round out the album somewhat unexcitedly. Maybe hit shuffle on this one, or stop half way. In any case, there are at least a few real keepers here.

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July album reviews

Meg Mac – Low Blows

Low Blows has been a while coming from Meg Mac – the softly spoken Melbournian who belts out soul like a seasoned pro. With a couple of singles and damn fine covers to her name, a debut album was hotly anticipated and although it’s a fleeting visit, it does the trick. A hefty double-up leads Low Blows, firstly with ‘Grace Gold’ – laying down an instant groove and earworm chorus – followed by the powerful title track. While instrumentation like piano and percussion dress things up here, the real kicker is Mac’s voice, which packs serious punch, especially in urgently soulful moments like ‘Don’t Need Permission’. While there’s cool drum work on tracks like ‘Kindness’, Mac’s voice hardly even needs a musical backdrop in many places. ‘Ride It’ is a late highlight, surely crafted to be performed live with musical cutouts bound to enhance an audience sing- and clap-along. Mac made an impression several years ago, so it’s cool to see she’s now following through with an extended offering.

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Lana Del Rey – Lust for Life

Honestly, I don’t care if I’m alone here – this is not a great album, not even a good one. Acclaim for Lana Del Rey’s latest seems way over the top. Sure, there’s occasionally some interesting writing on Lust for Life, and I get that her breed of pop steps away from all the expected glitzy smiles of the genre, but this is far too much of the same, bland, flat-line pop to be an enjoyable package. Lana exhibits little vocal range and draws on other big names to add flavour where she can’t – the prime example being The Weeknd’s employment to heighten the title track. A$AP Rocky appears in a couple of others, but they’re fairly terrible, while Stevie Nicks’ appearance is plain weird. Songs like ‘Groupie Love’ and ‘13 Beaches’ are unconvincing, if not vacuous, and add to an overall drone that fills a whopping 72 minutes. An attempt to rouse things up on closer ‘Get Free’ is too little, too late, as the fixed-tempo gloom of Lust for Life’s majority leaves you wondering how on earth Lana came up with the name.

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Haim – Something to Tell You

Haim pick up where they left off with Something to Tell You – it’s like Days Are Gone just played right through to album number two. The sisters fall into a megastar spectrum between the guilty country pop of Shania Twain and classier efforts of Fleetwood Mac, all the while delivering some of the finest harmonies going around. They make daggy awesome, but are so good at doing so the cool kids that dig it don’t even realise. What I really love about their album is that for all the pop hooks that make Haim so accessible, they’re still able to swings things around into unexpected territory. Any single will sell Something to Tell You, but the album ends with three tracks – ‘Walking Away’, ‘Right Now’ and ‘Night So Long’ – that completely change the pace and mood set by the radio fodder before them. You’re lured into the back end of this album and when things go dark I reckon Haim prove how great they are. Variety, charm and melodic prowess make this a 2017 standout.

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Vera Blue – Perennial

Perennial is a bit of a strange album – beautiful, but often cross-genred to the point of weird. There are plenty of singer songwriter types emerging at the moment and, likewise, plenty of laptop dance acts continuing to rise on the Aussie scene. While I feel like she emerged as predominantly the former, Vera Blue heavily combines the two on this album. What she leaves us with is a whole bunch of dance tracks you don’t necessarily want to dance to. Opening track ‘First Week’ is a subtle pop track – sweet vocals, simple instrumentation… Then the heavy synths drop and it morphs into something far bolder than you’d have thought it could. ‘Give In’ and ‘Regular Touch’ follow a similar mold, cranking up the production big time. Then things calm with ‘We Used To’, which relies on an incredible vocal range and rousing percussion instead of the artificial, and it feels far more natural. There’s a tug-of-war between bangers and beauties that continues from there to album’s end. For every over-manufactured one like ‘Lady Powers’ there’s a fragile stunner like ‘Pedestal/Cover Me’. And while Perennial is confusing at times, Vera Blue’s voice is the saving grace of this album. Even when everything else seems haywire – she’s got some serious power.

May album reviews

Asgeir – Afterglow

‘Afterglow’ is the title and lead track from Asgeir’s latest, and it’s a beautiful summation of what is so excellent about the Icelander. Twinkling piano accompanies the beautiful voice, boosted a minute in with superb harmonies and, not long after that, rich string sections. Simply put, it’s bloody gorgeous. Asgeir has drawn likeness to Bon Iver in the past, but where the American went all technologically wacky last year, Asgeir has stayed on the vocally pure path that made both so great to begin with. Afterglow begins strong, with complex production in places balanced with simplicity elsewhere. ‘Underneath It’ begins extremely gently and could easily be an acapella track, but allows dark electronic glitches to creep in. ‘Dreaming’ is again vocally stunning, while ‘Unbound’ and ‘I Know You Know’ offer more complexity in their instrumentation. The latter half of Afterglow is really quite calm, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing; it’s just that whereIn The Silence had hugely rousing track ‘In Harmony’ rounding it out, album number two doesn’t have the spine-tingling latecomer it needs to perfect it.

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Dappled Cities – |||||

Dappled Cities are one of my favourite local acts to see live. The thing is, I’d much rather hear what new things they have recorded than risk dealing with the group’s Melbourne fan girls (really. friggen. annoying.) I’m pretty pleased then that ||||| is quite a grouse offering. Where their last album, Lake Air, felt like a collection of standalone pop songs strung together, the tracks on ||||| gel far better, making a cohesive piece that engages more wholly (possibly than ever before). It may be at the sacrifice of a clear “single” moment, but that’s not to say there aren’t memorable moments. Standouts include the gentle, quieter ‘Weightless’, which carries the best harmonies; ‘What Is Impossible’ introducing clever and whimsical elements; and ‘That Sound’ rounding things out with a little jauntiness not really found anywhere else on the album. ||||| is a mature and rewarding addition to the Dappled Cities catalogue – certainly in line with their best. (On a side note, releasing a fifth album named five on the 5th of May is pretty damn stellar.)

!!! – Shake the Shudder

!!! keep coming back to the dancefloor with sharpened pop sensibilities. The groove on opener ‘The One 2’ draws you right into Shake the Shudder, with the stellar vocals of Lea Lea providing a soulful introduction. It’s followed by ‘Dancing Is The Best Revenge’, which begins to feel like an M83 track with wispy spoken vocals over a subtle bassline, before thrusting into frenetic body-shaking joy. Every track thereafter keeps in step, moving through a wilderness of dance pop stylings. Where similar albums might take breathers for pacing sake, !!! just keep things in high gear. As a result, they’ve pulled off one of the finest pop offerings – or should I say modern disco – 2017 has seen so far. At album number seven, that’s a damn cool thing.

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Kasabian – For Crying Out Loud

When you get big, your music has to come with you, heaven forbid you fall from on high. In order to keep their status as festival kingpins – held for considerable time now – Kasabian have pulled out another hefty offering, complete with mosh filling lad-rock, awkward-indie-shuffle, and some token snorey soft stuff. For Crying Out Loud starts big with ‘III Ray (The King)’, a sample of staple Kasabian sound that twists into a bizarre structure toward its end (fading into another song that, oddly, is the same song…) There’s wailing anthems (‘Wasted’) and an eight-minute indie rave (‘Are You Looking For Action?’) boosting the energy of this album, but an attempt to create something balanced falls flat with lighter songs that feel unfortunately like filler (‘The Party Never Ends’, ‘All Through the Night’, ‘Sixteen Blocks’). The redeeming “slowie” is saved til the end – ‘Put Your Life On It’ a stereotype of Beatles-wannabe Britpop. Despite its predictability, it’s an absolute corker. As it builds, you’ll be hard pressed to not feel like a patriotic pom. For Crying Out Loud is flawed overall, but where it pulls punches it lands knock outs.

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April album reviews

Father John Misty – Pure Comedy

“The comedy of man starts like this / Our brains are way too big for our mothers’ hips / And so Nature, she divines this alternative / We emerged half-formed and hope that whoever greets us on the other end / Is kind enough to fill us in / And, babies, that’s pretty much how it’s been ever since”

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Father John Misty’s wit is endless and he’s tied a tonne of poignant humour with stirring musicality on third outing, Pure Comedy. There’s a swag of great lines on this album and it’s hard to pick a favourite. Tillman commentates on our woeful political state, God’s misjudgement, and our own selfish stupidity (I like ‘Ballad of a Dying Man’ lyric: “Eventually the dying man takes his final breath / But first checks his news feed to see what he’s ’bout to miss / And it occurs to him a little late in the game / We leave as clueless as we came”) throughout a series of well-worded lines, verses and even one 13 minute essay (‘Leaving LA’). I’m happy to leave any major interpretation to the smarty-pants folk; but it does seem to me that Pure Comedy is designed to set us up – smirk if you like at his witty lines, we really should be crying. The words throughout are accompanied by understated arrangements (strings, piano, acoustic guitar) and the occasional soulful outburst (‘Pure Comedy’, ‘Ballad of a Dying Man’), all tying in to form the exceptional country-tinged indie folk of Tillman’s preacher moniker.

Polish Club – Alright Already

A gritty and mean cover of Flume’s ‘Never Be Like You’ pricked my ears on Like a Version one week and drew my attention to one slick, yet unashamedly wild band. There’s only two guys in Polish Club, but that’s far from a detriment. They’re in good company, with the likes of duos Royal Blood or King of the North proving that two blokes can smash out a lot of sound. But Polish Club are a soul act at heart, and with Novak’s dominant, belting voice being their cherry on top, they set themselves apart from their contemporaries. Their first album is also pretty damn rad. Alright Already is quick, brash and frenetic. It’s like they made up their mind and raced out an album. But despite the rush of it all, or perhaps thanks to it, Alright Already sounds bloody fun. When these guys describe their sound as soul, there’s no safe sense to the description. It’s an amped up, rock’n’roll version of soul, the kind you’d get punched in the head in a mosh pit listening to, yet not really care about. It’s soul to be enjoyed loud and preferably live. But you’ve got to get to know the songs first, right? So get on this disc.

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Cold War Kids – LA Divine

Cold War Kids haven’t made a record like Robbers & Cowards since Robbers & Cowards. That was more than 10 years ago. If you claim they’re not the same as they used to be, get over it – you should have been saying that circa 2008. To get on with it then, LA Divine is bloody great. CWK quickly developed a big sound, shaped for stadiums but concealed in clubs. This album, then, is another example of rousing, raucous work intended to lift spirits and heart rates. There’s no mistake who you’re playing as ‘Love is Mystical’ kicks off – that piano, that voice and that chorus you wanna belt out are fell like classic CWK. Welcome additions to the catalogue include the familiar (‘Can We Hold On?’ feels much like ‘First’) and the varied, with a White Stripes feel on ‘No Reason To Run’ and CWK’s Cake moment as Willett speaks his way through ‘Wilshire Protest’. LA Divine is heavy and fast, with the exceptions quite odd; like slow ballad ‘Camera Always On’ only clocking in at half a minute long and the calm twist of ‘Free to Breath’ used to conclude the record rather than pace it. In its real body, ‘Ordinary Idols’ and ‘Part of the Night’ sound huge, while ‘Invincible’ glides and ‘Open Up The Heavens’ offers something growly, gritty and sexy. Altogether, this album is overwhelmingly blues and gospel laden stadium rock, with many great moments.

Future Islands – The Far Field

I’m more than happy to admit that I’m a recent Future Islands convert and lay no claim to diggin them before that demonstration of sheer brilliance. This means I’m also not across their long term growth. But I’m pleased to have heard them, and very pleased in their latest, The Far Field. This is a solid album lifted greatly by an symphony of arcade sounding synth, but most heavily by Samuel T Herring’s unmatchable voice. ‘Aladdin’ not only opens The Far Field, but it highlights it too. That’s not to say there’s no room to move, with ‘Ran’ and ‘Cave’ also early standouts, the latter of those teasing toward a death-growl from Herring that sadly doesn’t eventuate. Later on, ‘Candles’ and ‘Shadows’ act as the albums “twists”. The first is a wooing love song that changes the mood of the record, the second a cool duet with Blondie’s Debbie Harry that flicks back and forth. They’re strangely out-of-place among the more mutual material, but each is a welcome divergence none-the-less. What Future Islands lack in recorded form is Herring’s signature dance moves. I cannot wait to see The Far Field performed live, as these guys are easily one of the most exciting live indie band out there.

February album reviews

Maggie Rogers – Now That the Light is Fading EP

Maggie Rogers’ Now That the Light is Fading is grouse. It’s not fair, then, that there are only five tracks here. This EP is a really good insight into what Maggie has to offer – 20 minutes to show her wares and demonstrate why people should wait out for any longer catalogue additions. ‘Color Song’ – a track isolated to vocals – starts things off nice and chilled out, setting up the cool indie pop to follow in radio-friendly ‘Alaska’ and ‘On + Off’. The remaining songs flaunt more of Maggie’s gorgeous vocals captured so well on track 1, adding memorable pop hooks that make each track instantly loveable.

Elbow – Little Fictions

There are a great number of bands for which I can easily proclaim: “I like your old stuff better than your new stuff.” Elbow is not one of them. The band can’t put a foot wrong as far as I’m concerned. Not taking anything away from their earliest material, when The Take Off and Landing of Everything came out in 2014 – their sixth of now seven albums – it eventually launched to arguably my favourite. And they’ve delivered another dose of brilliance on Little Fictions. The rousing ‘Magnificent (She Says)’ is a formidable lead to a stellar new collection of tracks on this album, which moves between loving, joyous, uplifting, melancholy and all sorts – Elbow again delivering more feeling in 50 minutes than many bands can in a career. Along with the opener, cleverly percussive ‘Gentle Storm’, lyrically packed ‘K2’ and the stirring epic ‘Little Fictions’ are the strongest additions to a perfectly-rounded new addition to the Elbow family.

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Stormzy – Gang Signs & Prayer

I’m of the mind that grime music is terrible, so I set the bar pretty low when first listening to Stormzy; the next act in a line of British rappers who like black clothes, swearing a shit-tonne and generally coming across as very angry fellas. Why bother listening, then? Well, I guess I just like the way he says “bewts” and throws out truth bombs like “you’re never too big for Adele” in ‘Big For Your Boots’ (And that track has been hard to avoid). I was sucked in by one track, but this is far from a standout for me. There are some funny lines littered throughout and the odd winning track (2014’s ‘Shut Up’ resurfacing and claiming best on show), but there’s too much whatever everywhere else, with ‘Velvet’ sounding snorezy, the three-minute one-sided phone conversation ‘Crazy Titch’ far too self-indulgent, and ‘Mr Skeng’ (among others) sounding no different to any other grime act going around. That phone convo suggests Stormzy is taking grime “from a second rate genre to a first rate genre.” Do I agree? Meh.

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Dune Rats – The Kids Will Know It’s Bullshit

There’s a serious problem here because, evidently, the kids don’t know it’s bullshit. This is easily some of the worst local music around and having it constantly flogged on the radio is, well, bullshit. To be fair, if you’re a 15-year-old male who’s just discovered tinnies and weed, this is probably hilarious and close-to-home. But for all the rest of you that took this to number one on the Aria charts, please explain it to me? The music is appallingly unoriginal, the vocals painful to listen to, and the lyrics mind-numbing. Of course, that’s probably what they’re going for and I’ve missed the point altogether. Or maybe it’s just a complete load of rubbish and simply a Queensland thing.

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Middle Kids – Middle Kids EP

Some local talent is on serious fire at the moment. I couldn’t get over the number of female voices killing it in 2016 and I’m hoping the trend continues this year. Middle Kids’ self-titled EP is a good start. The tracks presented are an awesome representation of this Sydney three-piece and you’ll be singing along in no time. By the time Hannah’s vocals go high on ‘Edge of Town’, repeating the refrain “I’ve got something on my mind,” all you want to do is rock out hard. ‘Never Start’ follows, bringing you back to earth momentarily, only to get you similarly revved again when its own chorus rolls through. It’s not a formula, it’s a consequence of good song craft. Each song is its own entity – I wouldn’t turn one away if presented in isolation. For that, Middle Kids become very radio friendly, and an act that’s likely to draw in more fans with each offering. Generally middle kids are the unloved ones (certainly the case in my family), but I think I’m going to love these guys.

Jidenna – The Chief

Jidenna has a fair list of talents; he can sing, rap, and dresses impeccably. He has a lot to show off on his debut The Chief, which is why it comes across a tad hotchpotch. Drake’s getting rap Grammys for pop records, so maybe Jidenna is just covering all bases to avoid confusion down the track. Among the songs, there’s breathy war chanting, chats with dad, some icky auto tune, a lullaby nap, anthemic choruses, fiery rap and earworm pop – it’s all quite confusing. But despite the flip flopping, The Chief is a really fun album, full of clever lyrics, a touch of political poignancy, and memorable beats that stick with you even when not sticking to one another. All that is heavily seasoned with the man’s self-confidence –  he’s the chief, the lion, and even the better Bond (“And that lame tryna holler he a Bond wanna-be, He a Roger Moore I’m a Sean Connery, I know”).

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January album reviews

AFI – AFI (The Blood Album)

Time to dress in black, paint the mascara and wail in the darkness. If that doesn’t float your boat, you could add in a listen to the new AFI record, too… (Then you’d understand our pain *cries*) Davey don’t scream no more and they’re really a guilty pleasure these days, but I maintain AFI are cool-as-hell. Having reimagined themselves in various ways in the past, album ten does just feel like a continuation of Burials and Crash Love – not any dramatic turn probably due. Its familiar riffs and overall vibe are as melodically dark as you’d expect (“We both prefer romantic murder / To erase time and my, my empty life”). Track two bluffs a surprise, acoustic guitar leading ‘Still a Stranger’ to have you thinking: “What the hell are you doing AF…” before Jade steps in and brings it back to your expectant level of high spirited, rocky sadness, complemented at many turns by Davey’s anthemic choruses. Some people ask whatever happened to them emo kids? They’re standing behind you.

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The xx – I See You

I remember I was at a festival once and my bro, standing next to me, fell over. A nearby punter/nurse exclaimed dehydration, he assured it was the result of earlier surgery, but I knew the truth – the xx did it. Was this swooning in the actual sense of the word? No. More like snoozing (“the zz”). I was really delighted to hear I See You, then. For the most part, it’s a fun record that you want to stay awake for. The xx have brightened the hell up and its paying dividends. This is an album that will cheer you up, bring you back for many listens, and even make you dance (if you’re not the I’m-too-cool-and-hip-to-possibly-dance-to-music type)! Heaps of people loved them before, but it’s only now they’ve won me over.

Austra – Future Politics

In the event you’re ever caught up in a robot space alien cowboy invasion in the middle of the desert, you now have a soundtrack for said situation by way of Austra’s Future Politics. This is a wacky trip of a record, with loads of impressive (and occasionally comical) pitch and warble. The levels seem a bit weird, with vocals and synths on par, making Katie’s voice sound like its somewhere off in the distance or lost in space. But the upside is the album having a weird way of presenting the upbeat among darker edges – quite subtly cool. There’s plenty going on here, from vast and scared (‘I’m a Monster’), trippy psych (‘Future Politics’) and soaring vocal tracks (‘Gaia’). Overall there’s an air of positive gloom that still gives you something to nod, flail lightly or just pull weird shapes to.

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Kasey Chambers – Dragonfly

I can say quite confidently I’ve never been a fan of Kasey Chambers, although that being said I haven’t heard much beyond the whiney singles of the early 00’s. I was pretty surprised then, when one afternoon Henry Wagons played an absolute corker of a tune called ‘Ain’t No Little Girl’ on Double J. Heavy, rocky, soulful – the track sucked me right in. When he back announced it, I was really surprised, and with that I decided to give Dragonfly a go to see if I’d pegged her wrong back in 2001. I was kind of annoyed… I listened to the whole thing and there was a total of three dark belters! The rest was a blend of folk ballads and ramblings, old school blues, mournful country and religious nods. All bar the last of those categories are fine enough, but overall this album was not what I was sold on the radio.